Posts filed under ‘Publications’

The Closed World of Biosphere 2

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The Closed World of Biosphere 2: Why an Eccentric Ecological Experiment Still Matters 25 Years Later, Edge effects, Dec. 15, 2016.

December 15, 2016 at 5:46 pm Leave a comment

Untangling Intentions: Teaching the History of Climate Politics

51lw736myrl-_sx331_bo1204203200_“Untangling Intentions: Teaching the History of Climate Politics,” in Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities, Stephen Siperstein, Shane Hall and Stephanie LeMenager (eds.), (New York: Routledge, 2016), 272-278

Get the anthology here in US $ | UK £ | Eur €

September 29, 2016 at 8:49 am Leave a comment

Ouroboros Architecture

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“Ouroboros Architecture,” in The Routledge Companion to Biology in Art and Architecture, Charissa N. Terranova and Meredith Tromble (eds.), (New York: Routledge, 2016), 112-135.

This article explores how and why imagined and real environments in space came to serve as models for ecological design of earthly landscapes and buildings in the 1970s. It claims that life in space came to represent the peaceful, rational, and environmentally friendly alternative to the destructive, irrational, ecological crisis down on Earth. Spaceship management aimed narrowly at the biological survival of astronauts, an ethic which also came to dominate ecological design proposals on board Spaceship Earth. The result was a design programme which was at the expense of a wider aesthetic and social understanding of the human condition. The article reviews the work of leading ecological designers of the period, such as Ian L. McHarg, John Todd and the New Alchemists, Alexander Pike and John Frazer, Brenda and Robert Vale, Ken Yeang, Phil Hawes, and others. It situates their projects in the perspective of ecological research methods of the period and puts forward an understanding of their thinking in the context of space exploration. Today’s challenge is to escape the intellectual space capsule that ecologists have created for environmentally concerned architects.

Get the anthology here in US $ | UK £ | Eur €

September 19, 2016 at 3:17 pm 1 comment

My review of Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire

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Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire: New Views
on Environmental History, James Beattie, Edward Melillo,
and Emily O’Gorman (eds.), (New York: Bloomsbury, 2015).
Environmental History 21 (2016). May 1.
Download PDF

May 2, 2016 at 9:06 am Leave a comment

Art in the Anthropocene

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“Art in the Anthropocene,” in Jan Freuchen: Columna Translantica, (Oslo: Press, 2015), 112-121.

Global warming is now at the forefront of public debate, along with a host of related environmental concerns. Indeed, humans are changing the face of the earth so dramatically that geologists use the word “anthropocene” to describe a new planetary epoch formed by human impact. Artists have increasingly begun reflecting on how to engage in the climate debates about the degradation of our shared environment. Jan Freuchen’s Columna Transatlantica may belong within this new school of environmental art.

Get the book: NOK | US $

Download article in English here or Norwegian here.

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April 6, 2016 at 2:02 pm Leave a comment

A pioneer country? A history of Norwegian climate politics

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A pioneer country? A history of Norwegian climate politicsClimatic Change, (March 2016), 1-13.

The shift away from ecology towards climatology in Norwegian environmental policy in the late 1980s and 1990s was not accidental. A main mover was the Labor Party politician Gro Harlem Brundtland who did not want to deal with unruly and highly vocal Deep Ecologists. Better then to start afresh with a different set of environmental scholars appealing to the technocratic tradition within the Labor Party. Instead of changing the ethical and social ways of dealing with environmental problems as the Deep Ecologists were advocating, she was looking for technological and economic solutions. And she mobilized an international regime of carbon capture storage (CCS), tradable carbon emissions quota (TEQs), and clean development mechanisms (CDMs), all of which eventually were approved in Kyoto in 1997. This move towards technocracy and cost-benefit economics reflects a post-Cold War turn towards utilitarian capitalism, but also a longing to showcase Norway as an environmental pioneer country to the world. The underlying question was how to reconcile the nation’s booming petroleum industry with reduction in climate gas emissions. Should the oil and gas stay underground and the country strive towards the ecologically informed zerogrowth society the Deep Ecologists were envisioning? Or could growth in the petroleum industry take place without harming the environment as the Labor Party environmentalists argued?

April 4, 2016 at 3:43 pm Leave a comment

Global Design: Elsewhere Envisioned

423_5358_151253_xlPeder Anker, Louise Harpman, Mitchell Joachim, Global Design: Elsewhere Envisioned (Munich: Prestel, 2014).

Get the book:

US $ | CDN $ | GBP £

EUR € | JPY ¥ | INR

This book examines the possibilities for scaling design solutions to address global warming.

Global warming poses new challenges to the architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design communities. The immediate response has been a turn toward a host of energy-saving technologies. What has rarely been addressed, however, is the problem of scale. How can designers make sure that global solutions do not come at the expense of local cultures and environments? By placing human rational, emotional, technological, and social needs at the center of our environmental concerns, this book proposes a new global design initiative. The aim is to develop a language of design that can create proximity between individual responsibility and the current global environmental crisis. These featured projects showcase leading-edge design innovations at multiple scales. Global Design directors Peder Anker, Louise Harpman, and Mitchell Joachim discuss various ways in which design can reformat the unfortunate separation between humans and the natural world.

Review

Shaunacy Ferro, “7 Ways Architecture Can Tackle Global Warming” at FastCompany, Feb. 2015.

 

December 3, 2014 at 10:08 am 2 comments

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