School of the Earth

school of the earth

Peder Anker and Mitchell Joachim (eds.) School of the Earth: Gallatin Reimagined in 2061, (New York: Gallatin School, 2017).

School of the Earth is a vision for what the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at New York University should be like in 2061 at Albert Gallatin’s 300th birthday. The envisioned new school is designed with our planet in mind. It is a school designed to fit the local ecosystem. This book was born from a dedicated class of students lead by professors Peder Anker and Mitchell Joachim. Humans have done enough taking, the students argue, and it is time to start giving back. Giving back to our planet and each other. The world is more connected than ever before and it is only going to become increasingly more intertwined and complicated. School of the Earth is about the necessity of connection, not only from human to human but between nature and people as well. The new vision for the Gallatin School is complete with visionary images and a model created to educate students and the public that not only is it possible for humans to exist while giving back, but that we can help make the planet a better, healthier place for the future as well.

The book, the exhibition, the model, a film, a published manifesto in Confluence, and the web site were the final results made by students of the class “Designing for New Climates: Histories of Adaptation” co-taught with Mitchell Joachim.

Get the book: US $ | GBP £ | EUR €

In the news: WSN and WSN editorial

May 24, 2017 at 8:55 am Leave a comment

Furious! When I hear the word “Sustainable”

image.img.320.high

“Why do I draw my gun and get furious when I hear the word “Sustainable”?” Gallatin School, NYU, Apr 24, 2017.

‘FURIOUS!—Gallatin’s second PechaKucha event—aims to create an exciting dialogue among the many disparate and active researchers within the Gallatin community. Our hope is to broaden the intellectual exchange within our school and discover new links to each other’s work. The theme this year is FURIOUS!, a word we chose because it captures the passion, fervor, immediacy, and emotional investment we all bring to our work. PechaKucha is a structured presentation format where every participant shows 20 images, each for 20 seconds. The images advance automatically to coordinate with the speaker, creating a fast-pace for showcasing all types of work. It’s fast, furious—and fun!

April 24, 2017 at 8:56 am Leave a comment

The Closed World of Biosphere 2

bannerbio2ocean

The Closed World of Biosphere 2: Why an Eccentric Ecological Experiment Still Matters 25 Years Later, Edge effects, Dec. 15, 2016.

Including an exchange with Mark Nelson, May 2017.

Republished in Forestry Research and Engineering 1:2 (2017), 10.

December 15, 2016 at 5:46 pm Leave a comment

Human Heliostat NYU

 

Producers: Louise Harpman, Peder Anker, Keith Miller, Mitchell Joachim.  Director: Keith Miller. Actor: Priya Patel. Camera: Adam Golfer, Thomas Lau. Editor: Charles Chintzer Lai. Photography: Ivan Specht. Music: DJ Spooky. Production Assistants: Louisa Nolte, Rachel Stern. Participants: Cynthia Allen, Liz Appel, Jamie Berthe, Honor Bishop, Michelle Boukhover, Colin F Brett Nina R Demeo, Pasan Dharmasena, Jacob Ford, Hallie M Franks, Hannah Fullerton, Jason Gabaee, Aaron Gartenberg, Vince Gaudio, Subhankar Ghosh, Celine Rose Gruenberg, Georgina Hahn-Griffiths, Michael Hirschorn, Kristin Horton, Gisela Humphreys, William Kammler, Zoe A Kennedy, Sage Mastakouras, Stacie McDonald, Louisa Nolte, Celeste Orangers, Brennan O’Rourke, Annie Pluimer, Caroline Porter, Alejandro Ribadeneira, Kyle Richard, Arielle Ross, Henry Sheeran, Ivan Specht, Rachel N Stern, Luke Thurmond, Greg Vargo, Aleksei Waddington, John Wedge, Jen Weitsen.

December 5, 2016 at 9:34 am 1 comment

Untangling Intentions: Teaching the History of Climate Politics

51lw736myrl-_sx331_bo1204203200_“Untangling Intentions: Teaching the History of Climate Politics,” in Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities, Stephen Siperstein, Shane Hall and Stephanie LeMenager (eds.), (New York: Routledge, 2016), 272-278

Get the anthology here in US $ | UK £ | Eur €

September 29, 2016 at 8:49 am Leave a comment

Ouroboros Architecture

biology-in-art-and-architecture

“Ouroboros Architecture,” in The Routledge Companion to Biology in Art and Architecture, Charissa N. Terranova and Meredith Tromble (eds.), (New York: Routledge, 2016), 112-135.

This article explores how and why imagined and real environments in space came to serve as models for ecological design of earthly landscapes and buildings in the 1970s. It claims that life in space came to represent the peaceful, rational, and environmentally friendly alternative to the destructive, irrational, ecological crisis down on Earth. Spaceship management aimed narrowly at the biological survival of astronauts, an ethic which also came to dominate ecological design proposals on board Spaceship Earth. The result was a design programme which was at the expense of a wider aesthetic and social understanding of the human condition. The article reviews the work of leading ecological designers of the period, such as Ian L. McHarg, John Todd and the New Alchemists, Alexander Pike and John Frazer, Brenda and Robert Vale, Ken Yeang, Phil Hawes, and others. It situates their projects in the perspective of ecological research methods of the period and puts forward an understanding of their thinking in the context of space exploration. Today’s challenge is to escape the intellectual space capsule that ecologists have created for environmentally concerned architects.

Get the anthology here in US $ | UK £ | Eur €

September 19, 2016 at 3:17 pm 1 comment

DLD: Creative Hubs Around the Globe

Creative Hubs Around the Globe, DLD moderator for panel discussion  with Stefan Franzke, John Battelle, and Maryanne Gilmartin. May 4th 2016.

What is a “creative hub”? And what are the necessary factors to make them happen? Certainly, they don’t come out of nowhere, or do they? If not, what factors are of key importance? One or several of these factors play a role: business opportunities, real estate, cultural life, security, access to capital, know-how and universities, and, perhaps, politics. Why do some cities succeed? And why do some creative hubs fade away? And which role does the digital economy play, if any?

 

May 13, 2016 at 10:03 am Leave a comment

Older Posts Newer Posts


Connect

Latest tweets


%d bloggers like this: