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Bauhaus Centenary Interview

Bauhaus Centenary interview for Deutsche Welle (DW News), Jan 2nd 2019.

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Click here to see the interview 

January 4, 2019 at 5:10 pm Leave a comment

My review of National Park Science: A Century of Research in South Africa

9781316642023 Jane Carruthers, National Park Science: A Century of Research in South Africa (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017).

Journal of the History of Biology 51 (2018), 617–619.

Download PDF.

June 19, 2018 at 9:34 am Leave a comment

Collapse: Climate, Cities & Culture

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COLLAPSE: CLIMATE, CITIES & CULTURE focuses on the design community’s response to environmental urgency, using architectural models, design prototypes, drawings, and videos to frame and advance this vitally important conversation. COLLAPSE is not a dystopian future-scape, but is in fact our “right now.” The Directors of Global Design NYU believe that designers must join or initiate interdisciplinary efforts to find solutions for our current state of planetary peril.

COLLAPSE estimates that one species goes extinct every seven minutes and this rate may be up to 1000 times faster than evolutionary norms. In our exhibit design, the empty cages represent loss, or voids, in our natural world. They are like coffins for species whose graves we will never know, whose lives we will never learn about. The exhibit design also features over a ton and a half of e-waste, lent to us by environmental waste management company. E-waste (products with batteries or cords) contain poisonous heavy metals, chemical flame retardants, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). As our world becomes more interconnected, our production of e-waste is skyrocketing. Interconnectivity may save the planet in some ways, but its harm is already evident.

The practices and projects selected for this exhibition come from a myriad of disciplines and operate at multiple scales, in a range of forms—constructed works, materials and systems research, community development, speculation, and philosophy. These diverse projects are joined by their shared focus on improving the health and well-being of our fragile planet and all of its occupants. Design will help to determine how we face our current and future collapse.

The show featured contributions from more than thirty designers, including AGENCY, Alejandro Zaera-Polo, Alexander Felson, Anna Bokov, Anna Dyson, Archi-Tectonics, Architecture and Urban Design Lab, Axel Kilian, BiotA Lab, Carl Skelton, DESIGN EARTH, Experimental Architecture Group, Fernanda Canales, Forrest Meggers, Ghiora Aharoni Design Studio, Harrison Atelier, Jenny Sabin Studio, Julia Watson Studio REDE, Karen Holmberg, Maider Llaguno-Munitxa, Mark Foster Gage Architects, Mark Shepard and Moritz Stefaner, MASS Design Group, Mathur/Da Cunha, Mitch McEwen, NADAAA, nea studio, Nurhan Gokturk, Patrick Nash, pneumastudio/Cathryn Dwyre + Chris Perry, Rhett Russo, School of the Earth, SITE @ Princeton University, SO-IL, Terreform ONE, WXY, and Young & Ayata

Global Design NYU, Collapse: Climate, Cities & Culture, directed and curated by Peder Anker, Louise Harpman, Mitchell Joachim, The Gallatin Galleries NYC, June 12-29, 2018.

Seminar, Center for Architecture, 6-8pm, Oct. 3, 2018,

June 19, 2018 at 9:21 am Leave a comment

Anthropocene Architecture: Design Earth’s Geostories

“Anthropocene Architecture: Design Earth’s Geostories” with Nina Edwards Anker, The Avery Review 29 (Feb. 2018). [PDF]

Republished in: Rania Ghosn and El Hadi Jazairy, Geostories: Another Architecture for the Environment, (Barcelona: Actar, 2018), 206-213.

A review of the exhibition Geostories: Another Architecture for the Environment, created by Rania Ghosn and El Hadi Jazairy, which was on display at the Cooper Union School of Architecture in New York, October 17, 2017–December 2, 2017.

February 8, 2018 at 10:21 am Leave a comment

Human Heliostat NYU

 

Producers: Louise Harpman, Peder Anker, Keith Miller, Mitchell Joachim.  Director: Keith Miller. Actor: Priya Patel. Camera: Adam Golfer, Thomas Lau. Editor: Charles Chintzer Lai. Photography: Ivan Specht. Music: DJ Spooky. Production Assistants: Louisa Nolte, Rachel Stern. Participants: Cynthia Allen, Liz Appel, Jamie Berthe, Honor Bishop, Michelle Boukhover, Colin F Brett Nina R Demeo, Pasan Dharmasena, Jacob Ford, Hallie M Franks, Hannah Fullerton, Jason Gabaee, Aaron Gartenberg, Vince Gaudio, Subhankar Ghosh, Celine Rose Gruenberg, Georgina Hahn-Griffiths, Michael Hirschorn, Kristin Horton, Gisela Humphreys, William Kammler, Zoe A Kennedy, Sage Mastakouras, Stacie McDonald, Louisa Nolte, Celeste Orangers, Brennan O’Rourke, Annie Pluimer, Caroline Porter, Alejandro Ribadeneira, Kyle Richard, Arielle Ross, Henry Sheeran, Ivan Specht, Rachel N Stern, Luke Thurmond, Greg Vargo, Aleksei Waddington, John Wedge, Jen Weitsen.

December 5, 2016 at 9:34 am 1 comment

Untangling Intentions: Teaching the History of Climate Politics

51lw736myrl-_sx331_bo1204203200_“Untangling Intentions: Teaching the History of Climate Politics,” in Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities, Stephen Siperstein, Shane Hall and Stephanie LeMenager (eds.), (New York: Routledge, 2016), 272-278

Get the anthology here in US $ | UK £ | Eur €

September 29, 2016 at 8:49 am Leave a comment

Ouroboros Architecture

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“Ouroboros Architecture,” in The Routledge Companion to Biology in Art and Architecture, Charissa N. Terranova and Meredith Tromble (eds.), (New York: Routledge, 2016), 112-135.

This article explores how and why imagined and real environments in space came to serve as models for ecological design of earthly landscapes and buildings in the 1970s. It claims that life in space came to represent the peaceful, rational, and environmentally friendly alternative to the destructive, irrational, ecological crisis down on Earth. Spaceship management aimed narrowly at the biological survival of astronauts, an ethic which also came to dominate ecological design proposals on board Spaceship Earth. The result was a design programme which was at the expense of a wider aesthetic and social understanding of the human condition. The article reviews the work of leading ecological designers of the period, such as Ian L. McHarg, John Todd and the New Alchemists, Alexander Pike and John Frazer, Brenda and Robert Vale, Ken Yeang, Phil Hawes, and others. It situates their projects in the perspective of ecological research methods of the period and puts forward an understanding of their thinking in the context of space exploration. Today’s challenge is to escape the intellectual space capsule that ecologists have created for environmentally concerned architects.

Get the anthology here in US $ | UK £ | Eur €

September 19, 2016 at 3:17 pm 1 comment

My review of Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire

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Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire: New Views
on Environmental History, James Beattie, Edward Melillo,
and Emily O’Gorman (eds.), (New York: Bloomsbury, 2015).
Environmental History 21 (2016). May 1.
Download PDF

May 2, 2016 at 9:06 am Leave a comment

Art in the Anthropocene

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“Art in the Anthropocene,” in Jan Freuchen: Columna Translantica, (Oslo: Press, 2015), 112-121.

Global warming is now at the forefront of public debate, along with a host of related environmental concerns. Indeed, humans are changing the face of the earth so dramatically that geologists use the word “anthropocene” to describe a new planetary epoch formed by human impact. Artists have increasingly begun reflecting on how to engage in the climate debates about the degradation of our shared environment. Jan Freuchen’s Columna Transatlantica may belong within this new school of environmental art.

Get the book: NOK | US $

Download article in English here or Norwegian here.

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April 6, 2016 at 2:02 pm Leave a comment

A pioneer country? A history of Norwegian climate politics

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A pioneer country? A history of Norwegian climate politicsClimatic Change, (Online March 2016), 1-13. Journal edition 151:1 (2018), 29-41.

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The shift away from ecology towards climatology in Norwegian environmental policy in the late 1980s and 1990s was not accidental. A main mover was the Labor Party politician Gro Harlem Brundtland who did not want to deal with unruly and highly vocal Deep Ecologists. Better then to start afresh with a different set of environmental scholars appealing to the technocratic tradition within the Labor Party. Instead of changing the ethical and social ways of dealing with environmental problems as the Deep Ecologists were advocating, she was looking for technological and economic solutions. And she mobilized an international regime of carbon capture storage (CCS), tradable carbon emissions quota (TEQs), and clean development mechanisms (CDMs), all of which eventually were approved in Kyoto in 1997. This move towards technocracy and cost-benefit economics reflects a post-Cold War turn towards utilitarian capitalism, but also a longing to showcase Norway as an environmental pioneer country to the world. The underlying question was how to reconcile the nation’s booming petroleum industry with reduction in climate gas emissions. Should the oil and gas stay underground and the country strive towards the ecologically informed zerogrowth society the Deep Ecologists were envisioning? Or could growth in the petroleum industry take place without harming the environment as the Labor Party environmentalists argued?

April 4, 2016 at 3:43 pm Leave a comment

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